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Pink Needles
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Schacht Spindle Company
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Title
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spacer model: Allston spacer photos: Lynne Vogel

Tangy

Ripple is one of those patterns that's hard to describe. It's kind of faux entrelac with a ruffle surround, sort of. Fun to knit and fun to wear...it drapes like crazy.

Start by working a chain of alternating stockinette and reverse stockinette rectangles then pick up all in the round to knit reversible ripple edging.

Small details such as the use of the chain selvedge become useful design elements in this clever and fun to knit design.

To form a chain selvedge you just slip the first stitch of every row, leaving a single chain loop at the edge of the fabric for every two rows of knitting. Pick up under both loops of this chain and you form a visible chain on the reverse stockinette surface of the fabric.

SIZE

One

 
FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

Handspun version
Length: approx. 36 inches
Width: approx. 8.5 inches

Commercial yarn version
Length: approx. 70 inches
Width: approx. 9 inches

 
MATERIALS

Handspun version [shown above]
spacer Fiber: Three Waters Farm handpainted Blue Faced Leicester; 4 oz 'Winter Fields', 4 oz 'Winter Daybreak' Yarn: One ply 'Winter Fields', one ply 'Winter Daybreak' plied together to make a two ply sportweight yarn, approx 14 wpi. Allow 400yd/366m for the version shown. Fiber amounts will make enough yarn for long version (allow 550yd/503m), even if you spin dk weight (12-13 wpi). See Spinning Notes in the Pattern Notes section below.

Commercial yarn version [shown in technique photos and last modeled picture below]
spacer Knit One Crochet Too Camelino [90% Merino wool, 10% camel; 109yd/100m per 50g ball]; color: #527 Celery; 5 balls

Recommended needle size:
spacer 2 US #8/5mm circular needles, 32 inches or longer
[always use a needle size that gives you the gauge listed below -- every knitter's gauge is unique]

spacer 2 locking stitch markers or safety pins
spacer 24 plain stitch markers
spacer 2 ornate stitch markers (or markers of a different type from the plain markers); be sure that these spacer 2 markers are different from each other.
spacer Yarn needle

 
GAUGE

Handspun version
20 sts/32 rows = 4 inches in stockinette st

Commercial yarn version

16 sts/22 rows = 4 inches in stockinette st

 
PATTERN NOTES
[Knitty's list of standard abbreviations and techniques can be found here.]

Spinning notes: Once I spun my yarn, a two ply sportweight Blue Faced Leicester in Winter Fields and Winter Daybreak colorways (one ply of each) from Three Waters Farm, I decided to adapt the pattern to my yarn as follows. I cast on the same number of stitches and knit the rectangles exactly like the original Ripple, but I used a US 5 needle to get a finer gauge. I knew the scarf would be shorter, even if I knit the same number of rectangles, but I decided to shorten it further to a neckwarmer length by knitting only 20 rectangles. The edging is the same as the original. [I embellished it with a scarf pin.]

The edging for this project is worked in the round using 2 circular needles. If you are unfamiliar with this technique, instructions may be found here and a video can be found here.

Instructions for the Long-Tail Cast On can be found here.

When picking up sts in slipped sts along an edge, always insert needle under both strands of the chain formed by the slipped sts.

Ripple

Left to right:
1:
Attach locking marker to end of CO row. Mark right side of fabric on knit face with another locking marker.

2: Stockinette st face of second rectangle and all left-slanting rectangles is on WS of work (note the clip on marker peeking through on the wrong side of first rectangle).

3: Third rectangle and all right-slanting rectangles have stockinette st face on RS of work.

DIRECTIONS
Rippleblank

CHAIN OF RECTANGLES

First Rectangle:
Using long-tail method, loosely CO 10 sts. Place locking st marker or safety pin in last st of CO edge.

Row 1 [WS]: Sl 1 purlwise, p9.

Row 2 [RS]: Sl 1 knitwise, k9.

Repeat these 2 rows 8 times more. Place a second locking marker or safety pin in center of this piece, on RS of fabric. This indicates RS of scarf; it is obvious now which side is RS, but after you have worked a few more squares, this will be a handy thing to refer to.

Second Rectangle:
Slide sts down cable of needle, freeing up a loop of cable. Turn rectangle 90 degrees clockwise. With RS facing, pick up and k 10 sts (1 st in each slipped st) along adjacent edge of piece (see photo). From this point on, work this rectangle using second circular needle.

Row 1 [WS]: Sl 1 knitwise, k9.

Row 2 [RS]: Sl 1 purlwise, p9.

Repeat these 2 rows 8 times more, then work Row 1 once more.

Third Rectangle:
Slide sts down cable of needle, freeing up a loop of cable. Turn rectangle 90 degrees clockwise. With WS facing, pick up and k 10 sts (1 st in each slipped st) along adjacent edge of piece. From this point on, work this rectangle using first circular needle.

Row 1 [RS]: Sl 1 knitwise, k9.
Row 2 [WS]: Sl 1 purlwise, p9.
Repeat these 2 rows 8 times more, then work Row 1 once more.

Note: Second and third rectangles are the same, except for the following things:
- Second rectangle is worked in reverse stockinette st, third rectangle is worked in stockinette st.
- Second rectangle is worked using second circular needle, third rectangle is worked using first needle. When these rectangles are complete, their sts will remain on the needles with which they were worked. This will make sense as work proceeds; all rectangles that slant one way are worked with one needle, rectangles that slant the other way are worked with the other needle.

Repeat second and third rectangles until you have worked 24 rectangles, ending with second rectangle. If you wish to lengthen or shorten the scarf, be sure to work an even number of rectangles.

Do not turn your work at end of last row; edging begins with WS facing.

Ripple
Ripple
Rippleblank

RIPPLE EDGING: FIRST TIER

Note: When placing markers in Set-up Round, use plain markers unless otherwise indicated.

Drop second needle (needle you have just been working with) and pick up first needle, bringing points of first needle together as if to begin working in the round.
Pick up and k 10 sts along left edge of rectangle just completed, place ornate marker to indicate beginning of round.

[K 10 sts of rectangle immediately next to picked-up sts, place marker, pick up and PURL 10 sts along adjacent edge of same rectangle] 12 times or until all rectangles on this needle have been worked; you will have reached the lower corner of the first rectangle. 12 stitch markers are in place; one at the outer corner of each triangle.

Drop first needle and pick up second needle.
Pick up and k 10 sts (1 st in each cast-on st) along CO edge of first rectangle. You will have just reached locking st marker. Remove this marker from work, place other ornate marker on needle to indicate midpoint of round.

[Pick up and k 10 sts along edge of adjacent rectangle, place marker, p 10 sts of same rectangle] 12 times or until all rectangles on this needle have been worked. Join to work in the round. See Pattern Notes re. working in the round using two circular needles; the edging is worked using this technique.

Two Important Notes:
- The points at which you switch from one needle to the next are not the beginning and midpoint of the round (though they may appear that way). The beginning and midpoint of the round are located at the points where the ornate markers are placed.
- In the directions that follow, treat the points between needles as if there are plain markers placed there; work increases at these points as are worked at all points with markers.

Using first needle, p10; you are now at beginning-of-round marker.

Each half of the round (between beginning-of-round marker and midpoint marker) contains three 10-st sections ('short sections') and eleven (depending on the number of rectangles worked) 20-st sections ('long  sections').

Round 1: K all sts to midpoint marker; p all sts to end-of-round marker.
Round 2: [K1, yo, k to 1 st before next marker, yo, k1] until you reach midpoint marker; [p1, yo, p to 1 st before next marker, yo, p1] until you reach beginning-of-round marker.
Repeat these 2 rounds three times more, then work Round 1 once more. Each short section now has 18 sts, and each long section now has 28 sts.

RIPPLE EDGING: SECOND TIER

Round 1: For first half of round, in each short section, work [p1, yo, p2, yo, p3, yo, (p2, yo) three times, p3, yo, p2, yo, p1]; in each long section, work [p1, yo, p2, yo, p8, yo, (p2, yo) three times, p8, yo, p2, yo, p1]. For second half of round, in each short section, work [k1, yo, k2, yo, k3, yo, (k2, yo) three times, k3, yo, k2, yo, k1]; in each long section, work [k1, yo, k2, yo, k8, yo, (k2, yo) three times, k8, yo, k2, yo, k1]. Each short section now has 26 sts, each long section now has 36 sts.

When working next round, remove all plain markers, but leave beginning-of-round marker and midpoint marker in place.

Rounds 2-5: P to midpoint marker, k to end of round.
Rounds 6-8: [K1, p1] to end.
BO all sts.

FINISHING

Weave in ends. If desired, block scarf by steaming each ripple separately. (Handspun version shown has not been blocked.) Be sure to set the temperature of your steam iron correctly for the fiber you used; do not steam synthetic fibers.

 
ABOUT THE DESIGNER

designernameBlank If you don't find Lynne dyeing, spinning, knitting, or crocheting, or writing about said activities, you might try looking for her on the many woodland trails around Sewanee, TN, with husband, James, and dogs Monk and Pearl. If she isn't there, she could easily be traveling to teach workshops nationwide.

Twisted Sisters Knit Sweaters, is her second book. You can find her patterns at her Etsy store and her yarns and fiber at Three Waters Farm. Find out where she's teaching this year on her blog.

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